Wed. Apr 8th, 2020

Space Force on track for Thursday launch of Atlas V rocket


Hide Transcript
Show Transcript

>> ONE OF THE FEW MAJOR LOCAL INSTITUTIONS STAYING AT FULL-SPEED THESE DAYS IS THE CAPE. AND BELIEVE IT OR NOT THERE IS , STILL A LAUNCH TOMORROW. WESH 2’S DAN BILLOW SHOWS US HOW THE SPACE FORCE IS STAYING ON TRACK. >> RIGHT ON SCHEDULE, AN ATLAS 5 ROCKET ROLLED FROM ITS PROCESSING BUILDING TO ITS LAUNCH PAD TODAY, AROUND 24 HOURS BEFORE ITS PLANNED LIFTOFF. IN A HANGAR NOT FAR AWAY, WORKERS OVER THE PAST MONTH OR SO HAVE STAYED ON THE JOB GETTING A NATIONAL SECURITY SATELLITE READY TO GO. THEY SEALED THE 7-TON SATELLITE INTO THE ROCKET’S NOSE CONE WHERE IT NOW SITS ATOP THE ROCKET AT THE PAD. HERE AT THE CAPE, EVERYONE IS WORKING AT HOME THEY CAN DO SO, BUT THERE’S A LOT THAT HAS TO BE DONE BY WORKERS ON SITE. IN FACT, FOR LAUNCH TOMORROW, ABOUT 300 PEOPLE ARE NEEDED – — NEEDED MANY OF THEM HERE IN , THE LAUNCH CONTROL CENTER. THOUGH THAT’S QUITE A FEW MORE THAN THE CDC’S RECOMMENDED MAXIMUM OF TEN, THE SPACE FORCE WILL DO ITS BEST TO KEEP THEM SOCIALLY DISTANT. >> WE SIT RIGHT NEXT TO EACH OTHER, BUT WE HAVE THE ABILITY TO SPREAD OUT BECAUSE OF THE NUBER OF CONSOLES, AND SO WE’RE GONNA SPREAD OUT FOR THAT. >> THE LAUNCH IS CONSIDERED A HIGH MILITARY PRIORITY. THE SATELLITE REPRESENTS AN UPGRADE IN THE PENTAGON’S ABILITY TO CONNECT ITS WARFIGHTERS ON GROUND, SEA AND AIR. IT’LL TAKE THE LARGEST VERSION OF THE 20-STORY ATLAS 5 TO GET THIS HEAVY SATELLITE INTO THE RIGHT PLACE IN SPACE. THE SPACE FORCE INTENDS TO HOLD UP ITS END ON THE YEAR’S LAUNCH SCHEDULE, EVEN IF SOME MEMBERS OF ITS LAUNCH AND PROCESSING TEAMS GET SICK. >> WE HAVE ENOUGH PEOPLE THAT CAN BACK EACH OTHER UP THAT WE BELIEVE WE’LL BE ABLE TO CONTINUE THE MISSION. >> SO FAR, EVERYONE’S HEALTHY. AT THE CAPE, DAN BILLOW, WESH-2 — WESH 2 NEWS. >> LIFTOFF IS AT 2:47 TOMORROW AFTERNOO

Space Force on track for Thursday launch of Atlas V rocket

The Space Force at Cape Canaveral is staying on track with a launch scheduled for Thursday.An Atlas V rocket rolled from its processing building to its launch pad Wednesday, around 24 hours before its planned liftoff. In a hangar not far away, workers over the past month or so have stayed on the job getting a national security satellite ready to go. They sealed the seven-ton satellite into the rocket’s nose cone where it now sits atop the rocket at the pad.Many workers at the Cape have been working from home, but there’s a lot that has to be done by workers on site.For Thursday’s launch, about 300 people are needed. Many of those will be in the launch control center. Though that’s more than the CDC’s recommended maximum of ten, the Space Force will do its best to keep them socially distant.“We sit right next to each other, but we have the ability to spread out because of the number of consoles, and so we’re going to spread out for that,” Brig. Gen. General Doug Schiess of the 45th Space Wing said.The launch is considered a high military priority; the satellite represents an upgrade in the Pentagon’s ability to connect its warfighters on ground, sea and air. It’ll take the largest version of the 20-story Atlas 5 to get the heavy satellite into the right place in space. The Space Force intends to hold up its end on the year’s launch schedule, even if some members of its launch and processing teams get sick.Liftoff is scheduled for 2:47 p.m. Thursday. Public viewing areas in Cape Canaveral and at the Kennedy Space Center are closed.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. —

The Space Force at Cape Canaveral is staying on track with a launch scheduled for Thursday.

An Atlas V rocket rolled from its processing building to its launch pad Wednesday, around 24 hours before its planned liftoff.

In a hangar not far away, workers over the past month or so have stayed on the job getting a national security satellite ready to go. They sealed the seven-ton satellite into the rocket’s nose cone where it now sits atop the rocket at the pad.

Many workers at the Cape have been working from home, but there’s a lot that has to be done by workers on site.

For Thursday’s launch, about 300 people are needed. Many of those will be in the launch control center.

Though that’s more than the CDC’s recommended maximum of ten, the Space Force will do its best to keep them socially distant.

“We sit right next to each other, but we have the ability to spread out because of the number of consoles, and so we’re going to spread out for that,” Brig. Gen. General Doug Schiess of the 45th Space Wing said.

The launch is considered a high military priority; the satellite represents an upgrade in the Pentagon’s ability to connect its warfighters on ground, sea and air. It’ll take the largest version of the 20-story Atlas 5 to get the heavy satellite into the right place in space.

The Space Force intends to hold up its end on the year’s launch schedule, even if some members of its la

Copyright © All rights reserved. | Newsphere by AF themes.