Tue. Feb 18th, 2020

A healing moment was held on the University of Central Florida’s campus to acknowledge two years since the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland on Valentine’s Day.Survivors like Alondra Cruz still ponders how could this have happened.”But we were hit. We were struck like lightning and our community was devastated but the best part was that our community came together afterward,” Cruz told the crowd at the vigil.”Ever since that day two years ago my memory has been completely shot I can hardly focus on things,” Robert Schentrup said. Schentrup is a senior at UCF but two years ago while in his dorm room,he got a call from a friend that there was an active shooter at his old high school. His 16-year-old sister Carmen was killed.”At that point it had just broke and my mom had literally heard about it the same time,” Schentrup said.He said the vigil is a comfortable space, with people who understand the pain. Schentrup said he is thankful for all the love on the UCF campus and says this, as well as his activism, is what is helping him to get through the pain.”A lot of it around gun violence prevention, you know, making sure we’re not only looking at firearm regulation, where the mental health plays,” Schentrup said. UCF will offer free and confidential mental health counseling for those students who are impacted.

ORLANDO, Fla. —

A healing moment was held on the University of Central Florida’s campus to acknowledge two years since the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland on Valentine’s Day.

Survivors like Alondra Cruz still ponders how could this have happened.

“But we were hit. We were struck like lightning and our community was devastated but the best part was that our community came together afterward,” Cruz told the crowd at the vigil.

“Ever since that day two years ago my memory has been completely shot I can hardly focus on things,” Robert Schentrup said.

Schentrup is a senior at UCF but two years ago while in his dorm room,he got a call from a friend that there was an active shooter at his old high school. His 16-year-old sister Carmen was killed.

“At that point it had just broke and my mom had literally heard about it the same time,” Schentrup said.

He said the vigil is a comfortable space, with people who understand the pain. Schentrup said he is thankful for all the love on the UCF campus and says this, as well as his activism, is what is helping him to get through the pain.

“A lot of it around gun violence prevention, you know, making sure we’re not only looking at firearm regulation, where the

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