Sun. Aug 18th, 2019

This was the first song astronauts played on the moon in 1969

This was the first song astronauts played on the moon in 1969 Hide Transcript Show Transcript SOLEDAD: NEXT WEEKEND MARKS THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF NASA’S APOLLO 11 MISSION AND HUMANS’ FIRST STEPS ON THE MOON. >> THAT’S ONE SMALL STEP FOR MAN, ONE GIANT LEAP FOR MANKIND. SOLEDAD: THOSE FAMOUS WORDS SPOKEN BY ASTRONAUT NEIL…
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This was the first song astronauts played on the moon in 1969


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SOLEDAD: NEXT WEEKEND MARKS THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF NASA’S APOLLO 11 MISSION AND HUMANS’ FIRST STEPS ON THE MOON. >> THAT’S ONE SMALL STEP FOR MAN, ONE GIANT LEAP FOR MANKIND. SOLEDAD: THOSE FAMOUS WORDS SPOKEN BY ASTRONAUT NEIL ARMSTRONG ON JULY 20, 1969 USHERED IN WHAT ARMSTRONG CALLED THE BEGINNING OF A NEW AGE. THE LANDING WAS WATCHED ON T.V. BY A HALF A BILLION PEOPLE AROUND THE WORLD. AND ON THAT SAME LANDING, FELLOW APOLLO 11 ASTRONAUT BUZZ ALDRIN DESCRIBED THE MOON’S SURFACE AS ” “MAGNIFICENT DESOLATION.” FOR MORE THAN TWO HOURS, THE TWO ASTRONAUTS EXPLORED THE MOON AND COLLECTED SAMPLES WHICH THEY BROUGHT BACK TO EARTH. IN TOTAL, SIX OF THE NINE APOLLO MISSIONS SUCCESSFULLY LANDED HUMANS ON THE MOON AND RETURNED THEM SAFELY HOME. THE ASTRONAUTS COLLECTED MORE THAN 800 POUNDS OF MOON ROCK DURING THEIR MISSIONS. SOME OF THOSE SAMPLES HAVE NEVER BEEN UNSEALED UNTIL NOW. DOCTOR JAMES GREEN IS NASA’S CHIEF SCIENTIST. HE’S BACK WITH US. IT’S ALWAYS NICE TO HAVE YOU. JAMES: MY PLEASURE. SOLEDAD: THANK YOU. THANKS FOR VISITING WITH US. SO HOW IS IT POSSIBLE THAT SOMETHING THAT TOOK PLACE SO LONG AGO AND BROUGHT BACK SOMETHING INCREDIBLE HAS NOT BEEN INVESTIGATED AND EXPLORED UNTIL NOW? JAMES: WELL, IT WAS DONE INTENTIONALLY, SO OUR POLICY FOR SAMPLE RETURN MISSIONS IS 25% OF THE MATERIAL STAYS PRISTINE, UNOPENED, AND IT’S IN ANTICIPATION OF SEVERAL THINGS. ONE, WE LEARN A LOT ABOUT THE SAMPLES THAT WE HAVE, THAT WE DO ANALYZE. THEN THAT ALLOWS US TO THINK ABOUT MORE THINGS THAT WE WANT TO DO WITH SAMPLES THAT ARE UNOPENED, AND SECOND, AND MOST IMPORTANTLY, THE TECHNOLOGIES IN THE LABORATORIES JUST EXPLODED, YOU KNOW. SO THE APOLLO 11 MISSION WHEN THEY BROUGHT BACK ROCKS, THERE WAS NO CT, YOU KNOW, SCANNING SYSTEMS CAPABLE. AND NOW WE SCAN OUR ROCKS AND NOW WE LOOK INSIDE THEM. THAT’S, YOU KNOW, ALL KINDS OF GAME CHANGING EQUIPMENT NOW IS AVAILABLE IN THE LABORATORIES. SOLEDAD: WHAT’S THE FUTURE OF MOON TRAVEL? OBVIOUSLY THE PRESIDENT HAS SAID 2024. I MEAN, IS THAT A REALISTIC DATE? IS THAT WHAT YOU’RE REALLY WORKING TOWARD RIGHT NOW? BY THE WAY THAT’S AROUND THE , CORNER. JAMES: YEAH, IT IS IN FIVE YEARS. IT’S A SPECTACULAR OPPORTUNITY TO TAKE ALL THE STUFF THAT WE’VE BEEN DEVELOPING AND MOVE IT FORWARD. I THINK WE CAN DO IT. IT’S TREMENDOUSLY EXCITING FOR US TO BE ABLE TO THINK ABOUT GOING TO THE MOON AS SOON AS THAT AND WE’RE GOING TO DO IT. SOLEDAD: WHY? WHAT DO WE NEED TO LEARN FROM THE MOON THAT WE DIDN’T GET THE FIRST GO ROUND? JAMES: SO THERE’S BEEN ALL KINDS OF DISCOVERIES OVER THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS AND PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ONE. IT’S AN ABSOLUTE GAME CHANGER IS THAT WE HAVE FOUND WATER IN ICE FORM IN THE PERMANENTLY SHADOWED REGIONS OF BOTH THE NORTH AND THE SOUTH POLE THE MOON. WATER IS EVERYTHING TO US BECAUSE THAT IS A RESOURCE WE THEN CAN DRINK. WATER IS WATER, OK. IT’S H2O. EVEN HERE ON EARTH AND ON THE MOON. BUT IT ALSO ALLOWS US TO BREAK IT APART. AND THE HYDROGEN AND OXYGEN CAN BE USED FOR ROCKET FUEL. THE HYDROGEN WE CAN THEN STORE BUT ALSO THE OXYGEN WE CAN BREATHE AND SO IT GIVES US ATMOSPHERE, LIFE FROM WATER, AND THEN ROCKET FUEL. AND THAT IS EXACTLY WHAT WE NEED WHEN WE GO TO MARS, A RESOURCE OF WATER. SOLEDAD: ALL OF WHAT YOU’RE DESCRIBING SOUNDS LIKE YOU’RE PLANNING FOR PEOPLE TO MOVE TO THE MOON ONE DAY. IS THAT CRAZY? JAMES: NO, IT’S NOT CRAZY. IT’S IN OUR FUTURE. YOU KNOW SOLEDAD: HOW NEAR FUTURE? JAMES: WELL, THE START OF THAT, OF COURSE, IS GOING TO THE MOON IN 2024. WE’RE GONNA DEVELOP AN INFRASTRUCTURE. WE’LL HAVE OPPORTUNITIES TO LITERALLY LIVE AND WORK ON A PLANETARY SURFACE. WE’LL PRACTICE THAT. SOLEDAD: ALL OF THIS IS WITH AN EYE TO ONE DAY PEOPLE POPULATING THE MOON? JAMES: AND MARS. YOU BET. LET’S GO. SOLEDAD: AND IS IT, BECAUSE EARTH IS GOING TO BE UNINHABITABLE? JAMES: NO. WE NEED TO TAKE CARE OF THE EARTH, THE BEAUTIFUL EARTH THAT WE HAVE. THERE’S NO QUESTION ABOUT THAT BUT I BELIEVE A SINGLE PLANET SPECIES CANNOT SURVIVE LONG. SO YES, OUR FUTURE GENERATIONS WILL BE LIVING ON MARS. SOLEDAD: AND HOW IN YOUR MIND — I WON’T HOLD YOU TO THIS BECAUSE I REALIZE IT’S A BIT OF A GUESSTIMATE — HOW FAR AWAY IS THAT? JAMES: WE HAVE TO LEARN TO LIVE AND WORK ON THESE SURFACES. AND THAT’LL TAKE A LITTLE TIME. BUT THIS CENTURY THAT WE’RE IN IS GOING TO SEE SOME REVOLUTIONARY CHANGES. AND I WOULD EXPECT US TO BE LIVING ON THE MOON AND ON MARS BEFORE THE END OF IT. SOLEDAD: DR. JIM GREEN, NICE TO HAVE YOU ALWAYS. THE CHIEF SCIENTIST AT NASA. ALWAYS A PLEAS

This was the first song astronauts played on the moon in 1969

Michael Jackson turned the moonwalk into a worldwide phenomenon. The name of the iconic dance described the move. Jackson looked as if he were defying the laws of gravity and physics, being pulled backward by trying to walk forward.The King of Pop had everyone from grandmothers to toddlers trying to replicate his footwork. But variations on the moonwalk were around much earlier. Cab Calloway did “The Buzz” in the 1930s. Judy Garland showcased something similar in “Meet Me in St. Louis.” James Brown had been doing it for years before Jackson.Each incarnation reflected a fascination with things beyond this Earth — movement as flight, as wonder, as exploration.David Bowie introduced Major Tom, his fictitious astronaut, on 1969’s “Space Oddity.” The Apollo 11 mission launched five days after the song’s release. The song itself was inspired by “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Major Tom would reappear throughout Bowie’s career.DJ Sun, a Houston musician whose own works evoke a cosmic sort of experience, found that connection in a 1974 piece by Jorge Ben Jor called “Errare Humanum Est” (”To Err is Human”).“He addresses our curiosity with space travel and how it reconciled with him being a devout Catholic from Brazil,” Sun says. “It was such a beautiful listen that I enlisted Tim Ruiz of La Mafia to help me assemble a band to perform a 15-minute tribute to the song at a SXSW 2012 showcase.”Those otherworldly influences were bolstered when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon 50 years ago. The astronauts themselves understood the intertwined connection between music and their mission.Armstrong played “Music Out of the Moon: Music Unusual Featuring the Theremin” by composer Harry Revel and bandleader Les Baxter during the flight. It was a decidedly quirky choice. Armstrong is heard calling the 1947 recording “an old favorite of mine” on the Apollo Flight Journal. The music is also featured in the 2018 film “First Man.”Aldrin’s tastes were much more mainstream. His flight soundtrack included “Galveston” by Glen Campbell, “People” by Barbra Streisand, “Three O’Clock in the Morning” by Lou Rawls and “Angel of the Morning” by Bettye Swann.Frank Sinatra’s version of “Fly Me to the Moon” was the first music heard on the moon as Aldrin stepped onto the surface. It was previously played during the Apollo 10 mission.The impact of that momentous event rippled through music and pop culture. The moon became a muse for performers in every genre. Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon” became a rock benchmark. REM paid tribute to Andy Kaufman with “Man on the Moon.” Latin artists La Mafia (”Pideme la luna”) and Ana Gabriel (”Luna”) worked references into their own songs. There was a musical called “Moon Landing” about the Apollo 11 mission that played in 2007 in England.Those waves are still being felt today. Lil Wayne and Nicki Minaj teamed up for 2018’s “Dark Side of the Moon,” a song about literal star-crossed lovers surviving an apocalypse. (“She’s not at all impressed with the flames or the flickers/But take her for a walk on the moon as she wear slippers.”)But the biggest boon to space travel yet may be “NASA,” a 2019 track from Ariana Grande that equates love with, well — “It’s like I’m the universe and you be N-A-S-A.” The song features a spoken intro by “RuPaul’s Drag Race” star Shangela, who puts a feminine spin on Armstrong’s legendary words: “That’s one small step for woman, one giant leap for womankind.”Grande has always had an affinity for space. Her 2016 song “Moonlight” is a fan favorite. She exchanged tweets with the official NASA Twitter earlier this year, who quoted her song. And she visited NASA in May ahead of a Houston concert, calling it “the coolest day of my life.” The singer FaceTimed with astronauts in space and got to experience some NASA vehicles. Fly her to the moon, indeed.

Michael Jackson turned the moonwalk into a worldwide phenomenon. The name of the iconic dance described the move. Jackson looked as if he were defying the laws of gravity and physics, being pulled backward by trying to walk forward.

The King of Pop had everyone from grandmothers to toddlers trying to replicate his footwork. But variations on the moonwalk were around much earlier. Cab Calloway did “The Buzz” in the 1930s. Judy Garland showcased something similar in “Meet Me in St. Louis.” James Brown had been doing it for years before Jackson.

Each incarnation reflected a fascination with things beyond this Earth — movement as flight, as wonder, as exploration.

David Bowie introduced Major Tom, his fictitious astronaut, on 1969’s “Space Oddity.” The Apollo 11 mission launched five days after the song’s release. The song itself was inspired by “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Major Tom would reappear throughout Bowie’s career.

DJ Sun, a Houston musician whose own works evoke a cosmic sort of experience, found that connection in a 1974 piece by Jorge Ben Jor called “Errare Humanum Est” (”To Err is Human”).

“He addresses our curiosity with space travel and how it reconciled with him being a devout Catholic from Brazil,” Sun says. “It was such a beautiful listen that I enlisted Tim Ruiz of La Mafia to help me assemble a band to perform a 15-minute tribute to the song at a SXSW 2012 showcase.”

Those otherworldly influences were bolstered when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon 50 years ago. The astronauts themselves understood the intertwined connection between music and their mission.

Armstrong played “Music Out of the Moon: Music Unusual Featuring the Theremin” by composer Harry Revel and bandleader Les Baxter during the flight. It was a decidedly quirky choice. Armstrong is heard calling the 1947 recording “an old favorite of mine” on the Apollo Flight Journal. The music is also featured in the 2018 film “First Man.”

Aldrin’s tastes were much more mainstream. His flight soundtrack included “Galveston” by Glen Campbell, “People” by Barbra Streisand, “Three O’Clock in the Morning” by Lou Rawls and “Angel of the Morning” by Bettye Swann.

Frank Sinatra’s version of “Fly Me to the Moon” was the first music heard on the moon as Aldrin stepped onto the surface. It was previously played during the Apollo 10 mission.

The impact of that momentous event rippled through music and pop culture. The moon became a muse for performers in every genre. Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon” became a rock benchmark. REM paid tribute to Andy Kaufman with “Man on the Moon.” Latin artists La Mafia (”Pideme la luna”) and Ana Gabriel (”Luna”) worked references into their own songs. There was a musical called “Moon Landing” about the Apollo 11 mission that played in 2007 in England.

Those waves are still being felt today. Lil Wayne and Nicki Minaj teamed up for 2018’s “Dark Side of the Moon,” a song about literal star-crossed lovers surviving an apocalypse. (“She’s not at all impressed with the flames or the flickers/But take her for a walk on the moon as she wear slippers.”)

But the biggest boon to space travel yet may be “NASA,” a 2019 track from Ariana Grande that equates love with, well — “It’s like I’m the univers

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