Tue. Feb 25th, 2020

President Donald Trump said Friday that the United States and Mexico have reached an agreement, indefinitely suspending tariffs that were to take effect Monday.”Mexico, in turn, has agreed to take strong measures to stem the tide of Migration through Mexico, and to our Southern Border. This is being done to greatly reduce, or eliminate, Illegal Immigration coming from Mexico and into the United States,” the president said in a series of tweets Friday evening.Trump said earlier Friday that the U.S. would likely strike a deal with Mexico to avert the tariffs he had scheduled for Monday. U.S. and Mexican officials held a third day of talks at the U.S. State Department on Friday to hash out a deal that would satisfy Trump’s demand that Mexico dramatically increase its efforts to crack down on migrants.The initial 5% tax on all Mexican goods, which would have increased every month up to 25%, could have ultimately had enormous economic implications for both countries.Americans bought $378 billion worth of Mexican imports last year, led by cars and auto parts. Many members of Trump’s Republican Party and business allies have urged him to reconsider — or at least postpone actually implementing the tariffs as talks continue — citing the potential harm to American consumers and manufactures.Trump has nonetheless embraced tariffs as a political tool he can use to force countries to comply with his demands — in this case on his signature issue of immigration. Trump officials have said Mexico can prevent the tariffs by securing its southern border with Guatemala, cracking down on criminal smuggling organizations and overhauling its asylum system. But the U.S. has not proposed concrete benchmarks to assess whether Mexico is complying, and it is unclear whether even those steps would be enough to satisfy Trump on illegal immigration, an issue he sees as crucial to his 2020 re-election campaign.In Mexico, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador would not say whether he would accept his country agreeing to be a “safe third country.” But unlike on previous occasions, he didn’t rule it out. The Department of Homeland Security announced Wednesday that U.S. Border Patrol apprehensions of migrants illegally crossing the border hit the highest level in more than a decade in May: 132,887 apprehensions, including a record 84,542 adults and children traveling together and 11,507 children traveling alone.

WASHINGTON —

President Donald Trump said Friday that the United States and Mexico have reached an agreement, indefinitely suspending tariffs that were to take effect Monday.

“Mexico, in turn, has agreed to take strong measures to stem the tide of Migration through Mexico, and to our Southern Border. This is being done to greatly reduce, or eliminate, Illegal Immigration coming from Mexico and into the United States,” the president said in a series of tweets Friday evening.

I am pleased to inform you that The United States of America has reached a signed agreement with Mexico. The Tariffs scheduled to be implemented by the U.S. on Monday, against Mexico, are hereby indefinitely suspended. Mexico, in turn, has agreed to take strong measures to….

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 8, 2019

….stem the tide of Migration through Mexico, and to our Southern Border. This is being done to greatly reduce, or eliminate, Illegal Immigration coming from Mexico and into the United States. Details of the agreement will be released shortly by the State Department. Thank you!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 8, 2019

Trump said earlier Friday that the U.S. would likely strike a deal with Mexico to avert the tariffs he had scheduled for Monday.

U.S. and Mexican officials held a third day of talks at the U.S. State Department on Friday to hash out a deal that would satisfy Trump’s demand that Mexico dramatically increase its efforts to crack down on migrants.

The initial 5% tax on all Mexican goods, which would have increased every month up to 25%, could have ultimately had enormous economic implications for both countries.

Americans bought $378 billion worth of Mexican imports last year, led by cars and auto parts. Many members of Trump’s Republican Party and business allies have urged him to reconsider — or at least postpone actually implementing the tariffs as talks continue — citing the potential harm to American consumers and manufactures.

Trump has nonetheless embraced tariffs as a political tool he can use to force countries to comply with his demands — in this case on his signature issue of immigration.

Trump officials have said Mexico can prevent the tariffs by securing its southern border with Guatemala, cracking down on criminal smuggling organizations and overhauling its asylum system. But the U.S. has not proposed concrete benchmarks to assess whether Mexico is complying, and it is unclear whether even those steps would be enough to satisfy Trump on illegal immigration, an issue he sees as crucial to his 2020 re-election campaign.

In Mexico, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador would not say whether he would accept his country agreeing to be a “safe third country.” But unlike on previous occasions, he didn’t rule it out.

The Department of Homeland Security announced Wednesday that U.S. Border Patrol ap

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